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World Suicide Prevention Day takes place every year on 10th September. This year it's needed more than ever as rates of depression and suicide, that is all too often tragically the end result of that depression, are on the increase around the world.

Depression usually comes before a suicide, and we should never forget that mental and physical health are connected – after all, it's in the same body. Regular exercise has been proven through plenty of research to boost someone's mood, which can either mean someone totally avoids depression or it helps to lift it.

But there's still a long way to go in raising awareness – more than 6,000 suicides happen in Britain and Ireland each year. And there at least 60,000 people a year in these countries attempting suicide.

Some of the world's greatest sporting heroes have talked about their depression such as Frank Bruno, Marcus Trescothick and Kelly Holmes. Talking about it can be a major part of the recovery process. So if you're feeling depressed, please talk about it with someone now – contact mind.org.uk or samaritans.org If you suspect someone you know is depressed, try talking to them too.

Regular exercise will help:

  • The NHS suggests adults do 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity every week in order to help avoid depression.
  • Exercise lowers immune system chemicals that can worsen depression, as well as at the same time releasing the brain's feel-good chemicals.
  • Eating healthily will also give your mind and body a boost – plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables and cut down on fatty foods such as cakes, biscuits, meat and watch out for most take-aways.
  • Getting down to the gym is also a fantastic way to socialise, and that will avoid feelings of loneliness that are often experienced as part of depression.

Exercise will make you stronger in every way. We hope to see you soon!